Gene Butler’s passing

Hello Mushroom Enthusiasts & Members of the Mushroom Community,

It is with a heavy heart that I share with you the news of Gene Butler’s passing. Not only was Gene the SW WA Mycological Society’s esteemed honorary adviser, but he was the founder of the local Club 5 years ago. He also helped found the Snohomish County Mycological Society 35+ years ago. Through his countless hours of volunteerism with developing educational programs, keying out the specific genera in a published book, and the willingness to share his vast technical knowledge on mycology, the mushroom community is forever grateful.

Just the other day when he was bit frustrated with his recalling of a specific uncommon specimen, I had jokingly told him, he has forgotten more about the taxonomy of mushrooms than most of us will ever learn in a lifetime & not to fret. I think we’re all in agreement with that statement. His passing has left a giant chasm in the mushroom community. Gene became an integral part of the mushroom community beginning in the 1970s with assisting the original Pacific Northwest Key Council stretching over several states & spanning over 40 plus years. Gene was a well known & respected member of the local community through his involvement of various organizations & Lewis County has lost a great citizen.

We will share with you as more details become available regarding Gene’s celebration of life ceremony. Please feel free to share this within the mushroom community as Gene Butler was a very well known & highly respected mycologist. Our hearts are saddened by the loss of our dear friend.

Sincerely,
Heather Loose

Mushroom Collecting for the SCMS Show

Mushroom Collecting for the SCMS Show
(Shannon Marie Svensson 2014)

Every autumn the Snohomish County Mycological Society presents a mushroom show to help educate people about the wonders of wild mushrooms. This monumental task can only be accomplished through the help of the SCMS membership.

Who: YOU and your friends and family.
What: mushroom and fungus species collection for the show.
When: Saturday October 25th, from about 9-5; the earlier the better. We’ll be there into the evening. The Show is the next day on Sunday from 10-5.
Where: Collect in your area and bring them to Floral Hall at
Forest Park – 802 E Mukilteo Blvd. in Everett, WA 98201.
Why: Our annual show is possible only through the interest and efforts of our club membership and helpful mushroom enthusiasts.

How: For the best identification and preservation, please follow these guidelines when collecting mushrooms and fungus specimens for our show.

Collect the entire mushroom, including “roots” and subterranean structures beneath the soil. For identification reasons, it’s best to include a few leaves, tree needles or grass to clue in the IDers as to the environment where the mushroom was picked.
Russulas: If you know you have collected Russula mushrooms, make 1 fingernail scratch on the stem and bruise/brush the gills in one spot near the stem of one of the specimens. This speeds up the identification process for the IDers at the show.
Protect the mushrooms in paper bags (white paper bags, if possible), wax paper, or foil. Plastic bags turn mushrooms to mush, so please avoid their use when collecting. White sandwich bags are great because they can give a more accurate spore print.
Fresh is Best! Collect your mushrooms and fungus within a couple of days of the show. Keep them cool and out of direct sunlight.
Mist your mushrooms if they begin looking dry but don’t wash or soak them. The inky cap families like Shaggy Mane are delicate and definitely need to be gathered on Friday or on Saturday morning.
Ecology: To ensure the bountiful continuation of our natural resources, SCMS asks that you be respectful when collecting and leave your site in good order. Cover the holes, pick up your trash, and be as non-invasive as possible when collecting from nature.
Keep your collections in groups and let us know the area where they were found. A note telling the altitude, area, or park the sample was collected in is also helpful.
If possible, collect and group mushrooms of the same species that represent different stages of growth and maturity: baby buttons, prime adults.
If possible, keep the mushroom in the same orientation in which it grew. Tall mushroom can be placed gently into empty cartons or divided cardboard boxes. Keep small mushrooms safe from crushing by organizing them in recycled food containers.
Bring us everything you collect, even if you think your mushrooms are too common to matter. You may have the only sample of that particular mushroom family. If you find something interesting – bring it!
You are important to the show, and so is your mushroom.
PLEASE HELP: Snack patrol needed on Sunday for the volunteers.

At 5pm, the end of the show, we will clean up and have a big potluck.

PLEASE JOIN US! Bring a dish or dessert to share plus a beverage, your utensils and a plate.

Thank you, and we look forward to seeing you there!!!

Schriebers Meadow Foray – Need Help Identifying Fungi

These were found today near Schriebers Meadow on 9/20/2014. To see comments, click on the Comments link to the right of this post’s title (up and to the right a bit).

Here’s Igor’s assessment of them:
Mushroom 1 & 2 is very probably Catathelasma imperialis or ventricosa
Mushroom 3 Suillus brevipes or related
Mushroom 4 Stropharia, not sure about the species, maybe hornemannii
Mushroom 5 is probably Boletus chrysenteron

Mushroom #1

Mushroom #1

Mushroom #1

mush1_1.jpg

Mushrooms #2

mushrooms #2

Mushrooms #2

mushrooms #2

mushrooms #2

Mushrooms #3

Mushrooms #3

Mushrooms #4

Mushrooms #4

Mushroom #5

Mushroom #5

Mushroom #5

Mushroom #5